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thecorcorangroup:

Are you jonseing for some Thin Mints, Tagalongs or Samoas (our favorite, especially when frozen)?  Or, did you forget to place your order with your friend’s daughter?  Problem solved…visit one of the Girl Scouts of Greater New York Cookie Pop-Up Shops!  There’s one in each borough and they’re open a few days during the week selling your favorite cookies at $4.00 per box.

thisbottleofvodka:

Harry Potter Shots at the Barcelona Bar (NYC)

csmonitor:

Were social media networks pivotal to launching the protests of the Arab Spring, or only the latest tools used in the online activism movement building over the last decade? 
From this week’s cover story:
Though the broadcasting capabilities of social media helped spread the story, the international euphoria about social networking may be misplaced when it comes to organizing uprisings. Deeply rooted cultures of online activism were more important than the newest social networking brands.

Digital activism did not spring immaculately out of Twitter and Facebook. It’s been going on ever since blogs existed. - Rebecca MacKinnon, cofounder of Global Voices Online, a network of 300 volunteer bloggers writing, analyzing, and translating news in more than 30 languages. 

In Syria, in fact, one blogger says it was old-fashioned activism that pushed the digital world into the fight against President Bashar al-Assad.

“The street led the bloggers. Three months ago, I can’t speak about Bashar, even in a restaurant. Now we are saying, ‘OK, they [the protesters] are dying. What we can do is write. If we don’t talk, it’s now or never.’ And stories are coming out, all over, even from the 1980s, because people are feeling they are not alone.” - Marcell Shewaro, writer of marcellita.com, who left Syria for Cairo on June 19, after veiled threats from the government over her three-year-old Arabic blog, which she says has about 50,000 readers a month. 

That feeling brought people together in a way that literally saved lives in Tahrir Square, says Yasser Alwan, a photographer in Cairo who spent more than two weeks in the square with protesters. “People built 20 sinks and 20 toilets, spontaneously,” he says. “People brought blankets, donated tents – the third or fourth night it rained, and tarps appeared. A whole community was built in three or four days … which is what allowed them to stay.” Those same bonds, Mr. Alwan says, allowed them to surwvive the government’s first siege of the square, on Feb. 2.
Social media as change agent: Did Twitter and Facebook really build a global revolution? Read the full story here.
This Week’s Cover Image: In Yemen, a cellphone camera is used at an anti-government rally. (PHOTO: Reuters/John Kehe Illustration)

csmonitor:

Were social media networks pivotal to launching the protests of the Arab Spring, or only the latest tools used in the online activism movement building over the last decade? 

From this week’s cover story:

Though the broadcasting capabilities of social media helped spread the story, the international euphoria about social networking may be misplaced when it comes to organizing uprisings. Deeply rooted cultures of online activism were more important than the newest social networking brands.

Digital activism did not spring immaculately out of Twitter and Facebook. It’s been going on ever since blogs existed. - Rebecca MacKinnon, cofounder of Global Voices Online, a network of 300 volunteer bloggers writing, analyzing, and translating news in more than 30 languages. 

In Syria, in fact, one blogger says it was old-fashioned activism that pushed the digital world into the fight against President Bashar al-Assad.

“The street led the bloggers. Three months ago, I can’t speak about Bashar, even in a restaurant. Now we are saying, ‘OK, they [the protesters] are dying. What we can do is write. If we don’t talk, it’s now or never.’ And stories are coming out, all over, even from the 1980s, because people are feeling they are not alone.” - Marcell Shewaro, writer of marcellita.com, who left Syria for Cairo on June 19, after veiled threats from the government over her three-year-old Arabic blog, which she says has about 50,000 readers a month. 

That feeling brought people together in a way that literally saved lives in Tahrir Square, says Yasser Alwan, a photographer in Cairo who spent more than two weeks in the square with protesters. “People built 20 sinks and 20 toilets, spontaneously,” he says. “People brought blankets, donated tents – the third or fourth night it rained, and tarps appeared. A whole community was built in three or four days … which is what allowed them to stay.” Those same bonds, Mr. Alwan says, allowed them to surwvive the government’s first siege of the square, on Feb. 2.

Social media as change agent: Did Twitter and Facebook really build a global revolution? Read the full story here.

This Week’s Cover Image: In Yemen, a cellphone camera is used at an anti-government rally. (PHOTO: Reuters/John Kehe Illustration)

fastcompany:


On May 2, four helicopters carrying two-dozen U.S. Navy SEALs snuck  into Pakistan bound for Abottabad, flying low to avoid detection by  radar (that was switched off anyway).  Leading the way were a pair of Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawks modified for  extra stealth, including radar-absorbent coatings on their skin and tail  rotors with extra blades, dampening the noise. These and other features  were borrowed, analysts would later speculate, from the RAH 66 Comanche—a stealth helicopter prototype canceled by the Pentagon in 2004.
You know what happened next: The commandos landed inside Osama bin  Laden’s compound before the occupants knew they were there. (Neighbors  later reported they didn’t hear the choppers until they were on top of  them.) But one of the Black Hawks lost lift upong take off, and clipped  its tail on the wall of the compound. The SEALs blew it up before  escaping, preventing the top-secret technology from falling into  Pakistan’s hands. Or so they thought.

How a split-second stall in a top-secret chopper could lead to a  new-and-improved Chinese stealth fighter and greatly alter the  international arms race—in four easy steps.

fastcompany:

On May 2, four helicopters carrying two-dozen U.S. Navy SEALs snuck into Pakistan bound for Abottabad, flying low to avoid detection by radar (that was switched off anyway). Leading the way were a pair of Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawks modified for extra stealth, including radar-absorbent coatings on their skin and tail rotors with extra blades, dampening the noise. These and other features were borrowed, analysts would later speculate, from the RAH 66 Comanche—a stealth helicopter prototype canceled by the Pentagon in 2004.

You know what happened next: The commandos landed inside Osama bin Laden’s compound before the occupants knew they were there. (Neighbors later reported they didn’t hear the choppers until they were on top of them.) But one of the Black Hawks lost lift upong take off, and clipped its tail on the wall of the compound. The SEALs blew it up before escaping, preventing the top-secret technology from falling into Pakistan’s hands. Or so they thought.

How a split-second stall in a top-secret chopper could lead to a new-and-improved Chinese stealth fighter and greatly alter the international arms race—in four easy steps.

pechanga:

As the Pechanga Wine Festival nears, we wanted to take a look at some of the amazing wines that will be poured all day April 2nd.

The unique addition to this year’s Wine Festival is the broad selection of wines we’ll have from vineyards from around the world. Check out a few of them below:

thetrevorproject:

In an appearance on Extra today at the Grove in Los Angeles, Adam Lambert talks about the Grammy’s, American Idol, and his new remix/release of his single “Aftermath” to benefit The Trevor Project. Thanks for the shout-out, Adam!

the20s:

FOX To Use High School Players As De Facto NFL Scabs? The above tweet comes to us from ESPN’s Bill Simmons, who reiterates in a later tweet that he isn’t kidding.  And I so, so, so, so wish he was.  Using awkward, untalented 16-year-olds as replacement players?  It’s Rupert Murdoch’s most diabolical union-busting ploy yet.  -DM [Bill Simmons]

the20s:

FOX To Use High School Players As De Facto NFL Scabs? The above tweet comes to us from ESPN’s Bill Simmons, who reiterates in a later tweet that he isn’t kidding. And I so, so, so, so wish he was. Using awkward, untalented 16-year-olds as replacement players? It’s Rupert Murdoch’s most diabolical union-busting ploy yet.

-DM

[Bill Simmons]

stickersonthecentralline:

On 31st August 1997 passengers should seek alternative arrangements due to essential (social) engineering works. The Monarchy would like to apologise for any inconvenience this may cause you.

stickersonthecentralline:

On 31st August 1997 passengers should seek alternative arrangements due to essential (social) engineering works. The Monarchy would like to apologise for any inconvenience this may cause you.

hotparade:

Javier Arcenillas - from the series Sicarios via

hotparade:

Javier Arcenillas - from the series Sicarios
via

hmvofficial:

Doctor Who - Series 6 (Part 2) Trailer (HD)

Fresh from San Diego’s Comic-Con event, our first look at the new Doctor Who Series 6 episodes!

Will you be watching when Doctor Who returns to our screens this Autumn?